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M-110 8in Self-propelled Howitzer

The M110 is a heavy but highly mobile and maneuverable self-propelled artillery piece designed to provide general artillery support to infantry or armor over a wide range of terrain conditions. It can be airlifted in large cargo aircraft.

The M-110 entered service with the U.S. Army in 1963, gradually replacing the M-55 8-inch Self-Propelled Howitzer. The gun is an 8-inch Howitzer traversing in it's mount at the rear of the vehicle. The large spade at the rear is hydraulically operated. When lowered it keeps the vehicle in place as the gun is fired, opposing the massive recoil. The 8-inch howitzer fired a 200-pound projectile as much as 25 miles, while being the most accurate weapon in the field artillery of its time.

An M110 8-inch (203mm) self-propelled howitzer during a combat training exercise, 1977
An M110 8-inch (203mm) self-propelled howitzer during a combat training exercise, 1977.

Today in WW II: 26 Oct 1940 First flight of the North American Aviation P-51 Mustang aircraft, only 117 days after the Government contract was awarded.  More 
26 Oct 1942 Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands: US and Japanese naval forces clash in southern Solomons as Japanese try to prevent US forces from responding to ground offensive on Guadalcanal.
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M-110 8 inch (203mm) Self-propelled Howitzer

The M-110 entered service with the U.S. Army in the early 1960s. It was developed as the T236 prototype by Pacific Car and Foundry Company (PACCAR, Inc.), standardized as the M110 in 1963. The M-110 8 inch (203mm) Self-propelled Howitzer has a crew of five, weighs 62,500 lbs, and has a top road speed of 34 mph with a range of 325 miles.

The same diesel powered chassis is used for the M107 self-propelled 175mm gun and the M110. In Vietnam, the M110 8 inch howitzer was found with most division artilleries, and both the 8-inch howitzer and M107 175mm gun were with field force artillery. At field force the proportion of 8-inch and 175-mm. weapons varied. Since the weapons had identical carriages, the common practice was to install those tubes that best met the current tactical needs. One day a battery might be 175mm while a few days later it might be half 175mm and half 8-inch.

The M107 self-propelled 175mm gun and the M110 self-propelled 8in (203mm) howitzer were both characterized by rapid barrel wear and the need to be able to change the barrels frequently and simply. The M578 Light Armored Recovery Vehicle (VTR) was developed to service these requirements using the identical diesel powered chassis.

Find additional photos and hi-res versions of the M-110 8 inch (203mm) Self-propelled Howitzer at the Olive-Drab Military Mashup:

US Army artillery crews conduct a firing exercise with an M114 155 mm howitzer, foreground, and an M110 203mm (8 in) self-propelled howitzer, 17 Sep 1985.
M110A2 Self-propelled 8-inch howitzer.
U.S. Army military policemen observe an M-110 203mm (8in) howitzer passing by with a convoy of other vehicles, December 1978.  Jeep to right is M151A2.
M-110A1 8-inch (203mm) Self-propelled Howitzer at the Yuma AZ Proving Ground, prior to being loaded aboard a YC-15 aircraft during a heavy loading test, 17 December 1975.  Markings indicate this howitzer is assigned to the U.S. Army Test and Evaluation Command.  Barrel is threaded for muzzle brake that is not installed.
M-110A2 8-inch self-propelled howitzer from Battery T, 5th Bn., 5th Marine Regt., 1st Marine Div., stands beneath camouflage netting in a Marine base camp during Operation Desert Shield, 21 Nov 1990.
A gun crew from Bravo Battery, 2nd Battalion, 147th Field Artillery (Watertown, SD), positions its M110 8-inch Howitzer during a winter shoot, Camp Ripley, MN, 1992.

M-110 8-inch Self-propelled Howitzer Photo Gallery

M-110 8in (203mm) Self-propelled Howitzer
M-110 8in (203mm) Self-propelled Howitzer at the Yuma AZ Proving Ground, prior to being loaded aboard a YC-15 aircraft during a heavy loading test, 17 December 1975. Markings indicate this howitzer is assigned to the U.S. Army Test and Evaluation Command.

M-110 8in (203mm) Self-propelled Howitzer
M110 8in (203mm) Self-propelled Howitzer underway during a training exercise, 1 December 1978.

M-110 8in (203mm) Self-propelled Howitzer
M-110 8in (203mm) Self-propelled Howitzer during an exercise at the Marine Corps Air-Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms, CA, 15 May 1985.

US Army artillery crews conducting firing exercises with an M110 203 mm self-propelled howitzer.  The gun partially visible in the foreground is an M114 155 mm howitzer, 17 September 1985
US Army artillery crews conducting firing exercises with an M110 203 mm self-propelled howitzer. The gun partially visible in the foreground is an M114 155 mm howitzer, 17 September 1985.

M-110A2 at 1st Cavalry Museum, Ft. Hood, TX, 2 December 2005
M-110A2 at 1st Cavalry Museum, Ft. Hood, TX, 2 December 2005. Photo: Courtesy of Bob Pettit.

M-110A2 at 1st Cavalry Museum, Ft. Hood, TX, 2 December 2005
M-110A2 at 1st Cavalry Museum, Ft. Hood, TX, 2 December 2005. Photo: Courtesy of Bob Pettit.

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