Aeromedical Evacuation (Fixed Wing)

Aeromedical evacuation, or AeroVac, refers to transporting patients via a fixed-wing aircraft, from a medical facility to a higher level of care.

Airmen from 109th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron, 133rd Airlift Wing, Minnesota Air National Guard carry a stretcher onto a C-130 Hercules cargo aircraft prior to a training flight from Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport, MN, 15 August 2007
Airmen from 109th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron, 133rd Airlift Wing, Minnesota Air National Guard carry a stretcher onto a C-130 Hercules cargo aircraft prior to a training flight from Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport, MN, 15 August 2007.

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4 Dec 1943 Second Cairo Conference with Roosevelt, Churchill, and Ismet Inönü of Turkey [Dec 4-6].
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Aeromedical Evacuation (Fixed Wing)

Fixed wing Aeromedical Evacuation aircraft have evolved from flying ambulances, a role taken over by helicopters, to being flying hospitals that move casualties to distant advanced care facilities while providing significant treatment on-route.

Aeromedical Evacuation by fixed wing aircraft is an exciting story of military medical personnel constantly striving to offer better treatment of the wounded on a faster timetable. From the inception of the use of military aircraft in World War I, its potential to rush the wounded to care facilities was recognized, although it took many decades for that potential to be realized. The advent of helicopters late in World War II added another dimension, working in concert with ambulance trucks and fixed wing aircraft to provide tiers of evac capability running from the foxhole to tertiary facilities far from the battlefield.

Aeromedical Evacuation by fixed wing aircraft is covered by time period in these Olive-Drab.com pages:

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