Today in WW II: 30 Jun 1940 German forces land in Guernsey, the start of their five year Occupation of the Channel Islands.  More 
30 Jun 1943 Invasion of New Georgia, Central Solomons, with Munda as its objective.
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Curtiss O-52 Owl

In 1940 the Army ordered 203 Curtiss O-52 aircraft for observation duties. Because of its limited performance characteristics, the O-52 was relegated to duties within the United States and limited coast patrol work. It did not see combat.

The O-52 was the last "O" aircraft (for Observation). After the O-52 the Army switched to the "L" designation, for Liaison, assigned to aircraft of this general type like the Taylorcraft L-2M Grasshopper and its successors.

The 5,364 pound (loaded) O-52 Owl was powered by a Pratt & Whitney R-1340-51 engine with 600 hp. It had a maximum speed of 215 mph, a cruising speed of 169 mph, cruising range of 455 miles, and a service ceiling of 23,200 feet. The length was 26 ft. 4 3/4 in., height 9 ft. 11 1/2 in., and wingspan 40 ft. 9 1/2 in.

The O-52 Owl was armed two .30 cal. machine guns, one forward and one rearward firing.

Curtiss O-52 Owl U.S. Army Air Force photo, World War II
Curtiss O-52 Owl U.S. Army Air Force photo, World War II.

Curtiss O-52 Owl photographed at the National Museum of the United States Air Force, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH, August 2005.  This aircraft was obtained from the U.S. Federal Reformatory at Chillicothe, Ohio, in November 1962. It was restored by the Pittsburgh Institute of Aeronautics, Pittsburgh, PA.  Photo: Courtesy of Bob Pettit
Curtiss O-52 Owl photographed at the National Museum of the United States Air Force, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH, August 2005. This aircraft was obtained from the U.S. Federal Reformatory at Chillicothe, Ohio, in November 1962. It was restored by the Pittsburgh Institute of Aeronautics, Pittsburgh, PA. Photo: Courtesy of Bob Pettit.