QuikClot Clotting Agent

Treating bleeding wounds of a Marine casualty
Treating bleeding wounds of a Marine casualty.

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Military Medical Technology: QuikClot Clotting Agent

QuikClot packaging and granular form
QuikClot packaging and granular form.

QuikClot is a sterile, traumatic wound treatment that rapidly arrests high-volume blood loss and achieves hemostasis in large wounds, arresting hemorrhage. QuikClot speeds coagulation in moderate-to-severe wounds, including high-volume venous and arterial bleeding. Made of a granulated mineral substance, it is biologically and botanically inert, leaving little chance of allergic reaction. It represents an opportunity for individual soldiers or Marines to save the lives of trauma victims who would otherwise bled to death before they could be reached by medical help or moved to an operating room setting.

QuikClot is a granular zeolite powder that absorbs fluid with handling properties similar to sand. When applied it can generate significant heat during the absorption process. Blood and clot should be wiped out of the wound prior to application.

Besides being exceptionally effective in stopping the bleeding, QuikClot, is simple to use — tear a corner off the plastic bag and pour the powder on the wound. Virtually indestructible, and biologically and chemically inert, it is well suited for the harsh conditions of the battlefield.

QuikClot Development and Packaging

QuikClot was developed by Newington, CT-based Z-Medica Corporation in collaboration with the Office of Naval Research, Marine Corps Systems Command and the U.S. Marine Corps Warfighting Laboratory, which were involved in the independent comparative testing that proved QuikClot's efficacy. It is included in the new Marine first aid kit and is in commercial use.

QuikClot packaging has a net weight of 3.5 ounces, is vacuum packed in a sterile, compact and waterproof. QuikClot comes in a 5 inch by 7 inch packet and is heat sealed on all four sides. The top of the packet has an easy to tear notch for quick access. Labeling on both front and back includes instructions, diagrams, and warnings.

The QuikClot package is included in Marine Corps Trauma Kit for the Individual First Aid Kit. The nomenclature is Wound Pack (QuikClot), Hemostatic Treatment, NSN 6545-01-499-9285.

Another product, HemCon, is replacing QuikClot for some military applications.

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