Combat Medical Treatment

The treatment of combat casualties starts on the scene. Depending on the nature and severity of the wound or sickness, the casualty may be treated and returned to duty or may be stabilized for evacuation through one or more levels (echelons) of military medical facilities. The worldwide integrated system of combat medical transportation, treatment and support is an outstanding accomplishment of military medicine.

Medic treats an infantryman injured in the Ardennes, Battle of the Bulge, December 1944-January 1945
Medic treats an infantryman injured in the Ardennes, Battle of the Bulge, December 1944-January 1945.

Today in WW II: 23 Feb 1942 Japanese submarine I-17 attacks a coastal oil refinery at Santa Barbara, CA. 17 high-explosive shells cause insignificant damage.  More 
23 Feb 1944 US forces achieve victory in the Battle of Eniwetok Atoll, in the Pacific Marshall Islands.
23 Feb 1945 US Marines from 28th Marines, 5th Marine Division captured the summit of Mt. Suribachi on Iwo Jima, after days of intense fighting. Without realizing its significance, Associated Press photographer Joe Rosenthal snapped the world famous Iwo Jima flag photo.
23 Feb 1945 Allied Forces cross the Roer River [Operation Grenade].
Visit the Olive-Drab.com World War II Timeline for day-by-day events 1939-1945! See also WW2 Books.

Combat Medical Treatment

The treatment and evacuation of casualties from the battlefield through all the echelons of care follows precise doctrine worked out over decades of combat experience. The goal is always to maximize the care and potential for return to duty within the scope of available resources. If the casualty can be treated successfully, treatment is given. If not, the casualty is stabilized for evacuated to the next echelon.

The mission is always difficult and changing circumstances often derail the best laid plans. Still, the military medical profession has been remarkably successful over the years in constantly improving rates of recovery even from the most egregious wartime injuries.

The 14th Combat Support Hospital, Fort Benning, GA, organizes, trains, deploys, and provides command and control of hospital forces, which provides comprehensive, high quality Level IV combat health support in support to world-wide contingency operations
The 14th Combat Support Hospital, Fort Benning, GA, organizes, trains, deploys, and provides command and control of hospital forces, which provides comprehensive, high quality Level IV combat health support in support to world-wide contingency operations.

This section describes how medical treatment and evacuation works, from immediate aid by a medic on the battlefield, through the evacuation chain to comprehensive treatment far from combat. Clink on the link to reach any topic on the list.

Find More Information on the Internet

There are many fine websites that have additional information on this topic, too many to list here and too many to keep up with as they come and go. Use this Google web search form to get an up to date report of what's out there.

For good results, try entering this: combat medicine. Then click the Search button.