Heating Field Rations

Field kitchens or other group feeding solutions are preferred if available, but often the individual soldier has to prepare his own meal. The use of Meal, Ready to Eat (MRE) rations has improved the meal quality and simplified preparation, but there is still a basic need to heat the food when possible. Heating not only helps control disease, but also makes the meal more paletable.

PFC Daniel Swain, a medic with the 9th Infantry Scout Company, heats a Canteen Cup of water over a Canteen Cup Stove to prepare a hot meal of field rations, Ft. Lewis, WA, 22 Mar 1982
PFC Daniel Swain, a medic with the 9th Infantry Scout Company, heats a Canteen Cup of water over a Canteen Cup Stove to prepare a hot meal of field rations, Ft. Lewis, WA, 22 Mar 1982.

Today in WW II: 12 Aug 1942 Second Moscow Conference: Churchill, Stalin and US representative planned the North Africa Campaign and future Second Front in France [12-17 Aug]. More 
12 Aug 1942 Winston Churchill appoints Lt. General Bernard L. Montgomery to command the British Eighth Army in N. Africa.
12 Aug 1944 Battle of the Falaise Pocket, the decisive engagement of the Battle of Normandy, begins; Allied fighter-bombers and artillery destroy twenty nearly-encircled German divisions [12-21 Aug].
12 Aug 1944 Florence, Italy liberated by the Allies.
Visit the Olive-Drab.com World War II Timeline for day-by-day events 1939-1945! See also WW2 Books.

Heating Individual Field Rations

Since World War II, methods used for heating individual field rations include:

Several fuels have been provided since World War II to give soldiers in the field a reliable way to generate heat, even under very poor conditions. These fuels are described on this page about Canteen Cup Stove Fuels.